Pulled Brick Design Options

Pulled Brick Design Options

I came across brick wall designs today where the architects were considering various options with pulled bricks. This design approach has been used before in many different ways but the basic principle is always the same: In a brick wall that is dominated by stretchers, you insert strategically placed headers which then protrude a little bit beyond the brick wall surface. This creates a very nice pattern with interesting shadows. The first image below shows such a design in a SketchUp model: Given that in reality these are placed manually it may be reasonably easy (and therefore not too costly) to vary the extend of their extension beyond the surface and thereby create more interesting undulating patterns. One such pattern is shown below: As it turns out, this is very easy to do by simply modifying some of the scripts from Chapter 7 and combining coding with a carefully created SketchUp model. The secret for success is having a component type (the...
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3D Basecamp 2018: Code your own SketchUp tools

3D Basecamp 2018: Code your own SketchUp tools

If you came to one of my presentations at the 2018 SketchUp 3D Basecamp in Palm Springs and are interested in the slides, here they are. You can find all of the code examples from the talks here (and on your USB "Stick of Knowledge"). In this presentation, I not only gave an introduction into Ruby coding with SketchUp, but I also explained how my own SketchUp extensions came to be and what is behind those from a coding perspective. Feel free to write any questions you have into the comments below. All the best with your Ruby coding endeavors... ...
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Scripting 101: Learn to Code with SketchUp (my 2016 #3DBasecamp presentation)

Scripting 101: Learn to Code with SketchUp (my 2016 #3DBasecamp presentation)

This page provides some additional information for my presentation at the 2016 3D Basecamp on Wednesday, June 15th 10:30 am - 12:00 pm in Sleeping Giant Description: Get your hour of code right here, right inside SketchUp! Learn the basics of coding with SketchUp’s Ruby language during this talk with just a few, easy-to-follow exercises. Coding is a rewarding skill that lets you precisely control the computer to create anything from simple lines to parametric geometry. Best of all: If you code with SketchUp, then you can even 3D print the results. If you are an educator: With the approach shown here, you can teach your students not only modeling or 3D printing with SketchUp, but also coding. Stay with one software rather than having to teach with several different ones! More Documents: Code samples handout ...
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Calculating Summed-up Volumes with Ruby (Snippet)

Calculating Summed-up Volumes with Ruby (Snippet)

This collection of small script snippets presents handy little routines that are usually too small to put into a proper extension. Use them with the Ruby Code Editor (just paste the code and hit "run") or make them more permanent as a menu item (see Appendix D in my book). I received an email a few days ago by someone who needed to calculate volumes and face areas in SketchUp for the purpose of estimating. I suggested doing this in a few lines with Ruby and as it turns out, it is pretty easy as long as the objects that need to be summed up are "solid" groups in SketchUp. I thought the solution could be useful for others, too, so here it is: Just paste the code below into the Ruby Code Editor in SketchUp. Then select the groups that you would like to sum up and press the Run button. With this version, you will get the sum of the volumes...
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