Making Everything 3D-Printable

Making Everything 3D-Printable

One of the hardest tasks with 3D printing with SketchUp is often making something that has not been modeled properly 3D printable. This means that whatever geometry you are given needs to be turned into a "watertight" or "manifold" solid. In SketchUp there are a bunch of extensions that help with this task (namely Solid Inspector and Solid Solver). But even they can't automatically fix a model like the one shown in the 3D viewer and images below. Fortunately for us, SketchUp and iMaterialize just announced a solution that is baked into 3D Warehouse.As you can see, this model is an intersection of three shapes (made without using SketchUp's Intersect tool), where I removed two faces and introduced a small triangular hole in one of the faces.I then uploaded this model to the 3D Warehouse the usual way (File > 3D Warehouse > Share Model...) and made sure the checkbox at the bottom was checked.After a few seconds, I was able to download an...
Read More
Why Component-Based Modeling Makes Sense (Video)

Why Component-Based Modeling Makes Sense (Video)

As I describe in chapter 3 of my book, a component-based modeling workflow makes a lot of sense. It allows you to use a hierarchical model organization, work with attributes, dynamic components and - most recently - Industry Foundation Classes (IFC). I covered this approach at Trimble's SketchUp 3D Basecamp in Vail earlier this year. You can view the entire presentation as a video below:http://youtu.be/WWUyyP9v6hwIf you are interested in Dynamic Components, also watch Eric Schimelpfenig's presentation on "Dynamic Components, Greatest Hits, Vol. 1".P.S. This a similar presentation to what I gave at Trimble's Dimensions 2014 conference last week....
Read More
Calculating Summed-up Volumes with Ruby (Snippet)

Calculating Summed-up Volumes with Ruby (Snippet)

This collection of small script snippets presents handy little routines that are usually too small to put into a proper extension. Use them with the Ruby Code Editor (just paste the code and hit "run") or make them more permanent as a menu item (see Appendix D in my book). I received an email a few days ago by someone who needed to calculate volumes and face areas in SketchUp for the purpose of estimating. I suggested doing this in a few lines with Ruby and as it turns out, it is pretty easy as long as the objects that need to be summed up are "solid" groups in SketchUp. I thought the solution could be useful for others, too, so here it is:Just paste the code below into the Ruby Code Editor in SketchUp. Then select the groups that you would like to sum up and press the Run button. With this version, you will get the sum of the volumes...
Read More
What’s New in SketchUp 2014? Better Ruby, for Example!

What’s New in SketchUp 2014? Better Ruby, for Example!

By now you most probably have heard that SketchUp 2014 has been released. There are quite a few great new-feature overviews and reviews out there and I'll suggest you look at the ones linked at the end of this post to get up to speed. For now, I just wanted to show you why the Ruby update in SketchUp 2014 is pretty amazing. Look at this image:What is so interesting about the image above? Well - those are images that were loaded from Flickr directly into SketchUp using the now included "net/http" library. Since SU 2014 not only updated Ruby to 2.0 but also included all of the standard libraries, stuff like this is now possible. You can integrate Net functionality much more and create all kinds of interesting mash-ups. To replicate what I did above, copy the following code snippet and either paste it into the Ruby Console (it now accepts multiline Ruby!) or into my Ruby Code Editor. Code SnippetSketchUp 2014...
Read More
Creating Photo Textures for Rendering

Creating Photo Textures for Rendering

As you just saw in the CLT example, having a good texture makes all the difference when you create renderings in SketchUp. I also discussed this in some length in the book (especially in the rendering chapter). To expand on this topic, here are some tips: Making a seamless texture Obviously a seamlessly repeating (a "tiling") texture is the most efficient way to go when you use textures. This allows you to use a small image to fill a large space. And if you use a good texture, you won't even see any seams or repeating patterns. As I described in the book, there are many places where you can get good quality tiling textures.However, what do you do when you need to make your own? First of all, start with a good image! This typically requires a few simple but important steps:Find the texture you are looking for (a brick wall, grass etc.). Be careful with the sun's position. If...
Read More