Making a 3D-Printable Patterned Panel (with Scale By Tools)

Making a 3D-Printable Patterned Panel (with Scale By Tools)

https://youtu.be/UmvTROcPETYThis video tutorial revisits a parametric 3D printable panel that I created a while ago using plain Ruby code. You can explore the original 3D model using the viewer below. Just click the image to start it.Since the underlying code is now included in my Scale By Tools extension, I used it to re-create the same panel. Watch the video to see how you can very easily create the same design (or whatever else you want) with it. You can then 3D print it, laser cut, CNC cut, or use a waterjet cutter to create this panel out of many materials....
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Random Tools for Rendering in SketchUp (with Enscape)

Random Tools for Rendering in SketchUp (with Enscape)

https://youtu.be/f8QSU63o5zE?list=PL9BB9780934A68B41This video tutorial shows how the Random Tools SketchUp Extension makes it easy to improve renderings, especially when vegetation is involved. I am showing how the tools work in the context of the real-time Enscape rendering software, however the principles apply to any renderer.With this extension, you can place objects randomly, rearrange them randomly (including size, position, and rotation). and adjust their textures randomly.LinksRandom Tools for Rendering in SketchUp (with Enscape) on YouTubeRandom Tools Extension ...
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Creating an Undulating Wall with Scale By Tools in SketchUp

Creating an Undulating Wall with Scale By Tools in SketchUp

This week's video tutorial shows an application of my recently published Scale By Tools SketchUp extension. Specifically, the Move Vertices by Image tool allows you to modify a mesh based on image data, which as a result embosses the image on that surface. This can then be used to create terrain, but it has many other applications, too. In this example, I am using this tool to deform a wood slatted wall with a ripple pattern. This would be manufactured using CNC cutting, for example.LinksCreating an Undulating Wall with Scale By Tools in SketchUpScale By Tools ExtensionA different approach: Creating an Organic Wall | Method 1 - From Spline Curves in SketchUp ...
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Trimming solid objects (Video)

Trimming solid objects (Video)

https://youtu.be/HSOKSD4U6IM?list=PLxUo4IvucruefSR-dwEs7pHAjQZgoOhw0In this video I use the example of a set of mitered beams to cover how to trim solid (i.e. volumetric 3D) objects in SketchUp. As always, there is more than one way to do this. In addition to what is mentioned in the video, also check out the Eneroth Solid Tools and Eneroth Slicer extensions.This is a free sample instructional video from the book "Architectural Design with SketchUp: 3D Modeling, Extensions, BIM, Rendering, Making, and Scripting" (2nd Edition). I discuss this topic more in detail in that book's Chapter 2.Want more of these videos? If you own the book, use the password from the inside cover to gain access to all of my remaining videos on Wiley's website: http://www.wiley.com/go/schreyer2e. If you don't yet have your own copy, follow the links in the sidebar to get one. It is a great reference for SketchUp! ...
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Floor Flatness Check in SketchUp with Point Clouds

Floor Flatness Check in SketchUp with Point Clouds

https://youtu.be/Q6prKH9vw9cAs I covered in last week's post, Trimble recently released a new point cloud extension for SketchUp, Trimble Scan Essentials For SketchUp. In today's post and video, I am using this tool to perform some analysis with the same 3D point cloud data that I introduced earlier (a scan of our classroom). I am basically checking how level the floor in our classroom really is by using what is aptly called a "floor flatness analysis".This approach is useful to verify any concrete work, especially if tolerances were defined in the specs. As you may have guessed already - our classroom's floor is not overly flat at all in some areas.My solution uses the extension's Inspection Map feature and simply compares the floor scan's points to a planar reference surface. This then results in a color-coded map that nicely illustrates where the ridges and valleys are. You can even label individual points and produce well-documented reports from this. Of course, the...
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