Making a 3D-Printable Patterned Panel (with Scale By Tools)

Making a 3D-Printable Patterned Panel (with Scale By Tools)

https://youtu.be/UmvTROcPETYThis video tutorial revisits a parametric 3D printable panel that I created a while ago using plain Ruby code. You can explore the original 3D model using the viewer below. Just click the image to start it.Since the underlying code is now included in my Scale By Tools extension, I used it to re-create the same panel. Watch the video to see how you can very easily create the same design (or whatever else you want) with it. You can then 3D print it, laser cut, CNC cut, or use a waterjet cutter to create this panel out of many materials....
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Just Published: Two New SketchUp Extensions (Random Tools & Scale By Tools)

Just Published: Two New SketchUp Extensions (Random Tools & Scale By Tools)

I just published two new SketchUp extensions that were both based on Ruby code that was either previously posted on this site or in my book, Architectural Design with SketchUp". Random Tools Ever wanted to place large swaths of randomly-arranged grass in SketchUp as shown in the image above? Have you been frustrated by textures that repeat a bit too much on copied wood boards? Do I have an extension for you...Read the announcement Scale By Tools Using the provided tools, you can scale, move or rotate objects based on an image or a mathematical equation. For the equation, you can choose between a trigonometric function or a power function. It is also possible to use image data to push/pull faces or move vertices, which can be useful to create ripples on water or a heightfield topography.Read the announcement...
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Second edition of “Architectural Design with SketchUp” is now available!

Second edition of “Architectural Design with SketchUp” is now available!

I am very excited to be announcing the release of the second edition of my book "Architectural Design with SketchUp" today!For this edition, I went back through the text and updated and improved a lot of content. As before, my main goal was to keep it relevant for as large a variety of SketchUp users as possible and at the same time provide thorough yet easy to follow examples and tutorials.I am also very excited to announce a completely new chapter on physically making things with SketchUp that includes 3D printing, CNC cutting, and other techniques. Lots of fun stuff!As before, this second edition will use the companion website at http://sketchupfordesign.com/the-book where you can find free sample chapters, videos, references, 3D models, and tutorials.There are also now over 30 videos that accompany the book and can be accessed using the instructions in the book.Interested in getting the book? Check out Amazon or Wiley.Here's the official press release:3D Modeling in SketchUp and Digital Making Come Together in Second Edition of “Architectural...
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What’s New With SketchUp 2015

What’s New With SketchUp 2015

This is What's New... Depending on who you ask and how those people use SketchUp, it is quite likely that they will hone in on different favorite elements in the 2015 release of SketchUp, which came out just this week and parallel to Trimble's Dimensions user conference in Las Vegas (which I attended, hence the late post). High on many people's wishlist was 64 Bit support, so that is likely what will get mentioned most. Others will find the new IFC (Industry Foundation Classes) importer extremely useful. Here is my perspective on the new features:The performance improvements from 64 Bit support, face-finder improvements, and the "fast styles" labels are significant. Even with a thorough, component-based workflow (as I described in Chapter 3 and in my Basecamp presentation) especially large models could in the past bog SketchUp down quite a bit. Things should now get much smoother, especially on powerful machines. The now built-in IFC importer is a tremendous addition! This allows SketchUp to at least...
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Calculating Summed-up Volumes with Ruby (Snippet)

Calculating Summed-up Volumes with Ruby (Snippet)

This collection of small script snippets presents handy little routines that are usually too small to put into a proper extension. Use them with the Ruby Code Editor (just paste the code and hit "run") or make them more permanent as a menu item (see Appendix D in my book). I received an email a few days ago by someone who needed to calculate volumes and face areas in SketchUp for the purpose of estimating. I suggested doing this in a few lines with Ruby and as it turns out, it is pretty easy as long as the objects that need to be summed up are "solid" groups in SketchUp. I thought the solution could be useful for others, too, so here it is:Just paste the code below into the Ruby Code Editor in SketchUp. Then select the groups that you would like to sum up and press the Run button. With this version, you will get the sum of the volumes...
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