Random Tools for Rendering in SketchUp (with Enscape)

Random Tools for Rendering in SketchUp (with Enscape)

https://youtu.be/f8QSU63o5zE?list=PL9BB9780934A68B41This video tutorial shows how the Random Tools SketchUp Extension makes it easy to improve renderings, especially when vegetation is involved. I am showing how the tools work in the context of the real-time Enscape rendering software, however the principles apply to any renderer.With this extension, you can place objects randomly, rearrange them randomly (including size, position, and rotation). and adjust their textures randomly.LinksRandom Tools for Rendering in SketchUp (with Enscape) on YouTubeRandom Tools Extension ...
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Creating an Undulating Wall with Scale By Tools in SketchUp

Creating an Undulating Wall with Scale By Tools in SketchUp

This week's video tutorial shows an application of my recently published Scale By Tools SketchUp extension. Specifically, the Move Vertices by Image tool allows you to modify a mesh based on image data, which as a result embosses the image on that surface. This can then be used to create terrain, but it has many other applications, too. In this example, I am using this tool to deform a wood slatted wall with a ripple pattern. This would be manufactured using CNC cutting, for example.LinksCreating an Undulating Wall with Scale By Tools in SketchUpScale By Tools ExtensionA different approach: Creating an Organic Wall | Method 1 - From Spline Curves in SketchUp ...
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Floor Flatness Check in SketchUp with Point Clouds

Floor Flatness Check in SketchUp with Point Clouds

https://youtu.be/Q6prKH9vw9cAs I covered in last week's post, Trimble recently released a new point cloud extension for SketchUp, Trimble Scan Essentials For SketchUp. In today's post and video, I am using this tool to perform some analysis with the same 3D point cloud data that I introduced earlier (a scan of our classroom). I am basically checking how level the floor in our classroom really is by using what is aptly called a "floor flatness analysis".This approach is useful to verify any concrete work, especially if tolerances were defined in the specs. As you may have guessed already - our classroom's floor is not overly flat at all in some areas.My solution uses the extension's Inspection Map feature and simply compares the floor scan's points to a planar reference surface. This then results in a color-coded map that nicely illustrates where the ridges and valleys are. You can even label individual points and produce well-documented reports from this. Of course, the...
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Point Clouds in SketchUp – Much Improved!

Point Clouds in SketchUp – Much Improved!

Scan Explorer in SketchUpA few days ago, the Trimble folks announced the release of a new point cloud extension for SketchUp, Trimble Scan Essentials For SketchUp. This came on the heels of their release of version 2020.1 of SketchUp Pro. And if you asked me, being able to easily work with point clouds in SketchUp is absolutely the most exciting feature of this year's release cycle!Never heard of point clouds? Check out this Wikipedia article as a primer.Up until recently, Trimble produced the Scan Explorer extension for SketchUp that allowed you to load a point cloud and extract construction points, planes, etc. into the 3D model. The workflow was a bit clunky in that the cloud would never load into the modeling environment but remained in the viewer dialog. This is now much improved in this new extension.I should mention at this point that there are also other LIDAR and point cloud extensions for SketchUp, most notably Undet, which you...
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Patterned Panel + Bending Extension = Cool Candle Holder

Patterned Panel + Bending Extension = Cool Candle Holder

Now that the days are getting shorter, it may be a nice home decorating idea to create a decorative candle holder. Having the powers of SketchUp and computational design methods as well as 3D printing at our fingertips, it does, of course, make sense to create something more interesting than just a boring lampshade.This brief example uses the patterned panel exercise from Chapter 7 to create the basic geometry. Of course you can replace the sinusoidal wave pattern easily now with another beautiful function, or you could even have the cutout pattern generated based on colors in an image, which allows you to make it look like a logo, landscape, etc.Since the resulting shape needed to have the pattern cut into a curved surface, there were basically two approaches: 1) create a curved surface and place the geometry onto it by arranging it radially (and then subtracting it), or 2) creating the panels flat and then curving them. Also, this...
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